Dan Reiland The Pastor's Coach – Developing Church Leaders
  • Confident Leader!

    You’re a good leader, but leadership is challenging and can rattle your confidence. Setbacks, challenges, and problems can cause you to second-guess yourself, doubt, or pull back. Your confidence may be stretched thin, but there is a way to strengthen it.

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    / March 7, 2020 / Comments Off on Confident Leader!

The sustained pressures of unanswered questions, unsolved problems, and an unknown future have caused leaders to pull back, hesitate, and in many cases, play it safe.

Here are a few statements from leaders in the past few weeks.

  • I know we already committed, but I’m not sure this is the right time to build.
  • Maybe we should wait to launch the next campus.
  • I think I need to hold back in my preaching with all the cultural tension. 
  • Maybe we should not hire anyone right now.

When you are on the front lines of leadership, these are not easy decisions.

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It’s obvious that attendance in physical buildings has dramatically declined over the past year, and with so many still disconnected from true engagement, what’s the best way to go forward?

Let’s start with something encouraging, people are coming back! Even some who have been away for a year!

When you consider who has and who hasn’t returned to church, what’s the best way to lead?

Start by knowing who. That will shape how you think, pray and make your next steps.

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Every leader is less gifted than someone, but what if you see yourself as somewhere in the middle of the pack?

Do you feel destined to remain there? That can feel internally demotivating. You probably have dreams and desires to lead better, larger, and have a greater impact.

In one sense, you can lead “above” your gifting.

What does that mean?

You can’t lead outside your gifts and talents, nor should you attempt to get out in front of God, but you can break out of the middle of the pack and elevate the gifts you do have so that the end result is leading with greater capacity than you possess on your own.

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The quality and enduring nature of your relationships will make or break your leadership.

That axiom is true in every arena of leadership but especially so in the church.

When coaching a leader who’s in a difficult situation, I ask them a blunt question. “Do they like you?” The response is usually a startled, “What? What do you mean?” “I mean, do the people you work with like you?” 

That may seem overly simplistic to what is likely a complicated situation, but the answer has a significant influence on the outcome.

If the people you work with like you, the potential to work out the conflict or get through a difficult circumstance is high. If they don’t, you are traveling uphill for sure.

An important question is how much do you invest in relationships? It’s like putting money in the bank. The more you have invested, the greater the returns, and over time it’s compounding in your favor.

In contrast, if you relationally make more withdrawals than contributions, over time, the people you work with won’t want to work with you.

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